Top PR Campaigns

show
show
show
show
show
show
show
show
NEXT POST

Archives

Categories

Deadpool 2 and Blockbuster

Since Ryan Reynolds’ sarcastic and witty anti-hero, Deadpool, first hit screens back in 2016 the landscape of superhero films has dramatically been altered, with the anti-hero becoming a top pick amongst Marvel fans opposed to the traditional options of Iron Man or Captain America. The second instalment of the movie franchise, Deadpool 2, exploded onto screens earlier this year with an impressive marketing and PR budget to support the films debut.

With the release of the film onto DVD and digital download last month the extensive marketing campaign culminated in the revival of a Blockbuster Video store in London. The beloved rental company was resurrected in Shoreditch, London, for two days only to mark the release of the film. The popup was solely stocked with limited edition versions of the film housed in VHS boxes. There were 1989 copies of the film, free to customers if they could produce their old Blockbuster membership card or show off their own superpower to the cashier. Tapping into the nostalgia of the video rental giant, 1989 was the year in which Blockbuster Video first opened its doors.

The stunt cleverly played into the main demographic of the Deadpool franchise. By connecting the nostalgic themes of the film and its time-travel elements to an age demographic (16-24 years old) which is most optimistic for a return of Blockbuster, according to research. Blockbuster at its height owned 9,000 stores worldwide, with 525 in the UK. The last UK-based Blockbuster Video closed its doors five years ago, but to a generation which has seen such vast technological advancement in a seemingly short space of time, nostalgia is high.

L’Oreal Paris and a floating catwalk at Paris Fashion Week

Fashion month is whirlwind of catwalk shows across four major cities worldwide which culminates in Paris twice a year, once for the A/W preview in Spring and once for the SS/S preview in September. With so many designers exhibiting their fashion line-up for the following season is it possible to really stand out from the crowd? L’Oreal seemed to think so as the company unveiled a floating catwalk on the river Seine ahead of its Paris Fashion Week catwalk show this past weekend.

The 60m long floating podium was installed at the Port of Solferino and wasn’t just open to the fashion elite, but to the public as well, with 200,000 spaces reserved for Parisians. The show displayed creations from 12 designers chosen by the label’s ambassadors, which included Eva Longoria, Isabelle Adjani and Doutzen Kroes.

The campaign was a good example of PR for many reasons. For one, it’s pretty hard to ignore a 60m long floating catwalk in the middle of the Seine, so the campaign certainly had exposure which is the principal aim of any PR campaign - and in such a saturated week of launches, exposure can be hard to achieve. The second, is that the campaign made fashion week accessible. Fashion Week, whether in New York, London, Milan or Paris is seen as a month of events for the fashion elite. Events you don’t receive an invite for unless you’re somebody in the fashion industry. It’s a month for those gilded in designer fashion which to the vast majority of the population is unattainable. By opening the show to 200,000 of the public, the show instantly became something different, something attainable, much like the L’Oreal brand. Although an umbrella corporation which under it houses the likes of Emporio Armani beauty and Yves Saint Laurent beauty, it also houses the likes of Maybelline Paris and L’Oreal Paris. These can be found on the high-street at budget prices. The campaign was clever because yes, it was a fashion show with a difference, but it delivered a larger underlying message, that fashion can be for everyone.

Leave a comment